Graphic design

For This Graphic Designer, a Vintage Bookshelf Represents Creative Freedom – Architectural Digest

Summary

What makes a purchase “worth it”? The answer is different for everybody, so we’re asking some of the coolest, most-shopping-savvy people we know—from small-business owners to designers, artists to actors—to tell us the story behind one of their most prized possessions.

Who?

After years of ephemeral New York City freelance gigs, Jess Marak landed a long-term graphic design contract at Google. The opportunity was a culmination of art direction and branding roles at Refin…….

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What makes a purchase “worth it”? The answer is different for everybody, so we’re asking some of the coolest, most-shopping-savvy people we know—from small-business owners to designers, artists to actorsto tell us the story behind one of their most prized possessions.

Who?

After years of ephemeral New York City freelance gigs, Jess Marak landed a long-term graphic design contract at Google. The opportunity was a culmination of art direction and branding roles at Refinery29, SoulCycle, and S’well, but it arose right when the pandemic hit, so commuting to the tech giant’s block-long Chelsea building was out of the question. Instead, the multi-hyphenate and her husband Garrett were stuck working remotely in their small East Village apartment.

When?

The couple’s cramped lockdown situation was less than ideal, so they took a leap and moved to Los Angeles last fall. In a Spanish-style Beverly Grove bungalow, Jess finally has the square footage she needs for a private artistic haven. “This office realizes my dream to have my own creative space,” she gushes. “It is also the spare bedroom, so it’s annoying when visitors come, but obviously I’ll share.”

While living in a house has done wonders for Jess’s professional productivity, it has also allowed her to take up personal projects and fun hobbies. Now she paints, gardens in the backyard, and makes wine. Most importantly, though, Jess has become passionate about decorating every inch of the new home with curated furniture and collected pieces.

What?

Through deep soul-searching and numerous Photoshop collages, Jess identified her ideal aesthetic as the playful postmodern. She researched the materials and shapes associated with the late-20th-century movement, so she could meticulously accumulate era-appropriate vintage treasures.

Her favorite find is a 1970s Bernhardt Flair bookcase crafted with burled maple and black lucite, which she stumbled upon in November of last year. “It’s like me personified in an object,” Jess effuses. “If I was a bookshelf, that’s what I would want to look like. When I first saw it, I thought it was the sexiest thing I’d ever seen in my life. I needed it.”

“It was actually pretty affordable considering burled wood is so expensive,” reveals Jess. “I was like, ‘This guy’s got a gem on his hands and he doesn’t really know what he has.’”

Where?

Jess quickly realized big retailers like West Elm and CB2 don’t carry the type of retro gems she was seeking, so she familiarized herself with the world of Etsy. She then discovered her beloved bookshelf on the site through Texas-based seller Urban Reliq …….

Source: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/for-this-graphic-designer-a-vintage-bookshelf-represents-creative-freedom